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  • Published: Wheaton, Ill. : Tyndale House Publishers, c1998.
  • Year Published: 1998
  • Description: 324 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Language: English
  • Format: Book

ISBN/Standard Number

  • 0842335714 (softcover)
  • 0842335706 :

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The last sin eater

by Rivers, Francine, 1947-

There are currently 2 available

Where To Find It

Call number: Fiction

Available Copies: Downtown 1st Floor, Traverwood Adult

Community Reviews

Defilement, despair, and depths

Goodness, I was afraid this book was going to be MUCH darker than it was! I was afraid the title referred to the central character herself! All in all, things went remarkably smoothly for the heroes. Some blood, yes, some despair, but it could have been much worse.

And yet ... many of the events in the valley's past WERE horrible. Enough to make a person quiver in rage and shame. Rivers touched on the depths of people's hearts, but I don't feel she really did them justice. How much does "the truth set you free"? And why does religious fiction seemingly so often show so little respect for human worth? (See Orson Scott Card's _Folk of the Fringe_.) The atrocities described here seem so far beyond what you'd read of in anything short of a Holocaust novel. I suppose it may have to do with the sure belief of Christian authors that their people are unredeemable except by God.

Conversion experiences are fascinating events. It's so wonderful to think of young people sitting at the feet of a prophet, barely able to comprehend his language and yet sure they are hearing the word of the Lord. What gives such certainty? I am a bit envious: my faith is a quiet and unremarkable little mite.

All in all, a book worth thinking about. I *had* heard of the sin eater concept, just in passing, a movie review for a recent church-themed thriller, I think, called perhaps _The Order_? Horrid idea. It makes sense for people to think that a person willing to take filth into himself becomes unbearably defiled. But defilement comes from the mind.

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