2006 Thumbs Up! Nominee

Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie--Vote For Me!
Scott hilariously documents in his journal (not a diary!) the trials and tribulations of his first year in high school – falling in love, drifting apart from his friends, dealing with his mother’s pregnancy, and learning more about himself than he expected.

2006 Thumbs Up! Nominee

Day of Tears -- Vote For Me!
Her master promised Emma that she would never be sold, but in 1859 she and over 400 other slaves were sold during a two-day auction know as “the weeping time.” Based on a heart wrenching true moment in history.

Multiple voices [master, slaves, runaways, adult, child] combine to create a horrific tale of slavery. In many ways this book is more powerful than reading a historic account. If this book is your choice for the best of 2005, vote for it by using the green ballot available at the library and put it in the box posted in the teen area, or give it to the librarian, or e-mail your choice to davise@aadl.org .

Calling All Gardeners

The crocuses are blooming, daffodils and tulips are emerging, and Spring is turning all gardeners' thoughts to the outdoors and the growing season. As a small nod to National Garden Week (April 9-15) here are some very recent books to consider as you plan your flower and vegetable gardens or think about reviving your lawns.
P.Allen Smith P. Allen Smith's Color for the Garden.
Marlene A. Condon The Nature-Friendly Garden
Fern Marshall Bradley Vegetable Gardening: From Planting to Picking

Quarter life crisis

It's not easy being green. Or not having much of anything green in your pockets. Or not knowing whether you went to the right college, or have a useful degree, or will ever find the right direction in your life. Quarter-life crisis anyone?

This book could make it a little easier: Should I Do What I Love? (or do what I do--so I can do what I love on the side). Even if it doesn't prove to be helpful, who doesn't love a snarky book?

2006 Thumbs Up! Nominee

Magic or Madness -- Vote For Me!
When her rational, magic-hating mother suffers a mental breakdown, Reason is taken to live with her grandmother, Esmerelda, where she discovers that something as simple as opening a door can bring forth a world of danger. Review after the break.

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (4/2/06)

Do you plan to use your extra daylight savings on reading a good book? There are two new contenders on the List this week.

At #5 is Dirty Blonde by Lisa Scottoline: it can be dangerous being a judge when the plaintiff murders the defendant.

At #14 is What Price Love? by Stephanie Laurens: a reformed scoundrel helps a noblewoman rescue her gambling brother. Can love be far behind?

2006 Thumbs Up! Nominee

Totally Joe -- Vote For Me!
From Addie (his oldest friend) to Zachary (his newest friend) and all the letters in between, Joe writes the story of his life as an alphabiography for school. Through this he learns about his friends, his family, and his own life as a gay 13-year-old.

Why did Gandhi make salt?

m k gandhi

On April 6, 1930, Mahatma Gandhi made a silent but symbolic protest to British indifference to Indians' civil rights. He and his followers marched 241 miles, leaving March 12th and arriving in the city of Dandi on April 5th. The next day, he made salt by evaporating sea water. This was illegal because only royalty had the privilege of making salt and a heavy tax was placed on everyone else. This protest, in which thousands besides Gandhi were arrested, gained worldwide attention as an example of the effectiveness of non-violent resistance.

Michel Faber is on the shortlist for the National Short Story Prize

Michel Faber

Michel Faber's short story, Safehouse, taken from his novella The Fahrenheit Twins, which appears in The Courage Consort: Three Novellas, is shortlisted for the prestigious National Short Story Prize, now in its second year.

With its substantial purse of £15,000 ($26,303), this Scotland-based honor is to short stories what the Booker is to novels.

The other authors on the shortlist for this year's prize, which will be announced on Monday, May 15, in London, include Rana Dasgupta, William Trevor, James Lasdun, and Rose Tremain.

First-ever Lulu Blooker (blogs-to-books) Prize winners announced

Blooker Prize winners

Julie Powell, author of the wildly popular Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen, was named overall winner of the Lulu Blooker Prizes for 2006. In her blog, Ms. Powell wrote of her determination to prepare every single recipe in Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking in a single year.

The 2006 Blookers, sponsored by Lulu, "...the world's fastest-growing provider of print-on-demand books...", coincide with the 450th anniversary of Gutenberg's moveable type, this putting lie to the predicted demise of the printed word.

The Blooker has three categories -- Fiction (Cherie Priest for Four and Twenty Blackbirds), Comics (Zach Miller for Totally Boned), and non-fiction (Ms. Powell).

Cory Doctorow, author of Essential Blogging, chaired the judges' panel.

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