World Series: Detroit vs. St. Louis: 1968 (Part Two)

McLainMcLain

Retrosheet has the box score and play-by-play for each game of the series

Some of the key players for the Tigers: Al Kaline (his only World Series appearance), Jim Northrup, Mickey Stanley, Dick McAuliffe, Norm Cash, Bill Freehan (coached the U-M baseball team from 1990-1995), Willie Horton, Don Wert, Mickey Lolich, Denny McLain, Pat Dobson, Earl Wilson, Joe Sparma.

Some of the key players for the Cardinals: Mike Shannon, Lou Brock, Curt Flood (the library has two recent books about his challenge of the reserve clause, leading to free agency), Orlando Cepeda, Julian Javier, Tim McCarver, Dal Maxvill, Roger Maris, Bob Gibson, Nellie Briles, Ray Washburn, Joe Hoerner, Ron Willis, Steve Carlton.

Managers: Mayo Smith (Tigers), Red Schoendienst (Cardinals).

John Fetzer was the Tigers owner.

The Tigers’ home games were played at the old Tigers Stadium:
A Place for Summer: a Narrative History of Tiger Stadium by Richard Bak
Home, Sweet Home: Memories of Tiger Stadium from the archives of the Detroit News
The Corner: a Century of Memories at Michigan and Trumbull by Richard Bak

Announcers: Ernie Harwell and Ray Lane were the radio announcers on WJR for the Tigers; George Kell and Larry Osterman covered the games on TV for WJBK; Harry Caray and Jack Buck announced for the Cardinals.

World Events in 1968: Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy assassinations; riots at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago; My Lai and the Tet offensive; Prague Spring; student protests in Berkeley, Ann Arbor, and the Sorbonne; Yippies; and Richard Nixon’s election as President.

Nineteen Sixty-Eight: a Personal Report by Hans Koning
1968: the Year That Rocked the World by Mark Kurlansky
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Anthony Shadid Visits AADL

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Anthony Shadid will visit the Downtown Library on Sunday, October 29 from 3:00 to 4:30 pm to discuss his book Night Draws Near: Iraq's People in the Shadow of America's War. The program will include a booksigning with ample opportunity for discussion.

Shadid has a remarkable body of work as a reporter from Iraq - and this should be an exceptional event.

World Series: Detroit vs. St. Louis: 1968 (Part One)

In 1968 it had been twenty-three years since the Tigers' last World Series appearance when they beat the Cubs in 1945 (this year the wait has only been twenty-two years).

1968 was the last year before the league championship series began. There was no designated hitter. The Tigers won the American League by 12 games with a 103-59 season. The Cardinals were the defending World Series champions and had won the National League by 10 games with a 97-65 season.

Game 1 (October 2) (St. Louis): St. Louis 4, Detroit 0
Game 2 (October 3) (St. Louis): Detroit 8, St. Louis 1
Game 3 (October 5) (Detroit): St. Louis 7, Detroit 3
Game 4 (October 6) (Detroit): St. Louis 10, Detroit 1
Game 5 (October 7) (Detroit): Detroit 5, St. Louis 3
Game 6 (October 9) (St. Louis): Detroit 13, St. Louis 1
Game 7 (October 10) (St. Louis): Detroit 4, St. Louis 1

Detroit’s Mickey Lolich (3-0) and St. Louis’ Bob Gibson (2-1) each pitched three complete games and each had an ERA of 1.67 for the World Series. Gibson’s World Series ERA was 0.55 runs higher than his baseball leading 1.12 regular season ERA. Gibson set the single game World Series record with 17 strikeouts in game one (at least one in each inning) and the series record with 35 strikeouts.

The library has two books about the 1968 Detroit Tigers:

The Tigers of ’68: Baseball’s Last Real Champions by George Cantor
Year of the Tiger: the Diary of Detroit’s World Champions by Jerry Green

We also have the Ann Arbor News on microfilm at the Downtown Library if you want to read the newspaper coverage of the series.
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Ever wonder what happened to your favorite fairy tale characters?

What if all of your favorite nursery rhyme, storybook and fable characters turned out to be real and were secretly living in present day New York? What happened to Snow White after she married Prince Charming? Did the Big Bad Wolf have any further pursuits after his run in with the Three Pigs? Bill Willingham answers these questions and more in his Eisner award winning comics series, Fables.

Writer Bill Willingham goes back to the original dark and sinister versions of the fairy tales, before they were ‘Disneyfied’. He has also added modern sensibilities to the stories, giving them a soap opera feel. This series is definitely not for children!

Look for other influences throughout the story-line, including Animal Farm, Lord of the Flies and Seven Days in May. Also, be sure to check out the latest in this series, 1001 Nights of Snowfall, (released this week) to explore character backstories as told by Snow White.

Massive police hunt in England! Two children vanish!

An encounter with an anti-gravity machine catapults Peter and Kate back to the 18th century and sets in motion a calamitous chain of events. While a massive police hunt gets underway to find the missing children in the 21st century – in 1763 a hardened criminal, the Tar Man, steals the anti-gravity machine and disappears into the London underworld.

Stranded in another time and forced to chase the Tar Man to his lair, Peter and Kate find a friend and guide in reformed cutpurse, Gideon Seymour. Gideon does every thing he can to help them, but will his dark past catch up with him before the machine is recovered?

Read Gideon the Cutpurse or listen to it on CD. Above description taken from the book's web site.

Cookies- anyone?

Cookies

One of my colleagues recently brought to work to share a container of home made cookies she made using her grandmothers recipe - yummy! I'm not knocking Toll House cookies but nothing compares to cookies made from scratch.

Does anyone remember the ongoing Cookie Bear comedy sketch on many of the Andy Williams television shows back in the sixties? Did the bear ever get any cookies?

If you don't have a favorite cookie recipe or are just looking for some great new ideas check out some of the Library's great books on cookie making and other desserts. A few I'd recommend are King Arthur Flour Cookie Companion, The 250 Best Cookie recipes and A Bakers Tour all available at the Library.

Mid-October NPR Picks: Midlife Leaps and Spanish Royalty

Read about public-radio journalist and author Katherine Lanpher's move to the Big Apple in her new book Leap Days: Chronicles of a Midlife Move. She left Minnesota on Leap Day 2004 for a chance to work with Al Franken in New York, and explores many topics in this collection of essays, including religion, middle age, and parenthood. You can listen to her on Talk of the Nation.

Nicaraguan writer Gioconda Belli has taken the compelling and dark tale of Juana of Castile, daughter of Isabelle and Ferdinand and mother of many monarchs, and spun it into a novel called The Scroll of Seduction, which was recently translated into English. Read an excerpt of the novel or listen to Jacki Lyden speak with Belli about her new book on All Things Considered.

A Hedonist in the Cellar: Adventures in Wine

Jay McInerney, author of Bright Lights, Big City and other novels, is also the wine columnist for House & Garden. This collection of his columns is reviewed by Michael Steinberger in next Sunday’s New York Times Book Review. Steinberger is gladdened by the emergence of “a more literary style of wine writing” in America. Steinberger finds the book “crisp, stylish and very funny.” He writes that “one of McInerney’s many virtues as a wine writer is that he seems to have no agenda apart from maximizing his pleasure.”

Additional recent wine books to enjoy with a glass of your favorite wine:

Extremely Pale Rose: a Very French Adventure by Jamie Ivey
The Grail: a Year Ambling & Shambling Through an Oregon Vineyard in Pursuit of the Best Pinot Noir in the Whole Wild World by Brian Doyle
History in a Glass: Sixty Years of Wine Writing from Gourmet edited and with an introduction by Ruth Reichl
Red, White, and Drunk All Over: a Wine-Soaked Journey from Grape to Glass by Natalie MacLean
Wine: a Life Uncorked by Hugh Johnson

Sweetheart of the Month- Bela Lugosi

Friday, October 20 is the birthday of Bela Lugosi, classic horror hero who stole our hearts in the original film production of Dracula. Lugosi was born on October 20, 1882 in Lugos, Hungary. Most of his acting career was in Germany before he came to the U.S. in 1921. Best known for his roles in horror movies, Lugosi started out playing more traditional roles, including Shakespeare.

Check out our great horror movie collection at AADL for a truly spooky Halloween night.

October is Family History Month in Michigan

Geneology

You never have all the information you want about your ancestors. There's always someone or some questions that you never asked until it was too late. Fortunately some records keep getting easier to locate and view.

Some states such as West Virginia have set up sites click here that allow people to view and download vital records such as birth, death and marriage records over 75 years old. Hopefully Michigan will do so in the near future. Recently I discovered the death certificates of my maternal grandmother and great grandmother via West Virginia's fine web site. What a find! Saved me hours of travel and/or countless correspondence.

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