Oriana Fallaci, Italian journalist and author, is dead at 77

Oriana FallaciOriana Fallaci

Oriana Fallaci, given the red carpet treatment by world leaders who granted her requests for interviews and who dreaded seeing her pull out her questions, has died.

Fallaci began her “journalist as lightning rod” reputation during the Vietnam War, cemented it right before the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico when she was shot multiple times and left for dead during a protest, and resurrected it, post 9/11, with her incendiary writings about Islam, including The Rage and the Pride (2001) and The Force of Reason (2006).

Fallaci died in Florence, Italy. She was 77.

Amazon.com's Teen Topsellers - Nonfiction

It's all about those pesky standardized tests this week on Amazon.com's Teen Topsellers. Here are a few to help you prepare. Good luck!

Cracking the SAT: with DVD
The Official SAT Study Guide: for the new SAT
The Real ACT Prep Guide: the only official prep guide from the makers of the ACT

Elisabeth Ogilvie, author of The Tide trilogy, has died

Maine author Elisabeth Ogilvie, who brought to life the romantic adventures of the Bennett family in her “Tide” books, has died.

Ms. Ogilvie used the wild weather and remote beauty of Maine’s islands beauty as backdrops to her old fashioned, popular “Tides” trilogy. High Tide at Noon was the first, published in 1944. It was followed by Storm Tide (1945) and The Ebbing Tide (1947). She updated the lives of the Bennetts in later titles, including An Answer in the Tide (1978).

Ogilvie, who also penned several children’s and teen books, was 89.

Amazon.com's Teen Topsellers - Fiction

Here is what's up for teens on Amazon.com's Topsellers list. See anything interesting? Maybe they left out your latest favorite. If so, post what you think should be added to the list.

New Moon by Stephanie Meyer
Eldest (Inheritance, Book 2)
Armageddon's Children by Terry Brooks
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Endymion Spring by Matthew Skelton
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

What's so great about Comics?

We all love Peanuts and Calvin and Hobbes, but do we know why? What is it about the comics art form that draws us in so effortlessly? Scott McCloud answers this in his 215 page graphic essay Understanding Comics. Whether you are a parent who wonders why your teen is fascinated with Naruto, or an aspiring comics professional, this work is an invaluable read.

Also follow the McCloud family (Scott, wife Ivy, and daughters Sky and Winter) as they make their way across the country with the Making Comics 50 State Tour. They will be in the Midwest in Spring of 2007.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #34

If you missed the full-page ad in last week’s New York Times, here is my personally endorsement…

If you like historical thriller, it does not get any better than The Interpretation of Murder. Set in the turn of the 20th century Manhattan, during his first and only visit to the United States, Sigmund Freud is drawn into the mind of a clever and sadistic killer who is savagely attacking the most privileged of society heiresses.

Fans of Caleb Carr will find themselves a new author to watch. Jud Rubenfeld is not only a distinguished legal scholar, but knows a thing or two about Freud and Shakespeare.

Here, he not only brings to life the glitter of the gilded age, the squalor of the working masses, the re-imagined relations between Freud and Carl Jung, but also such historic events as the building of the Manhattan Bridge. With a complex plot and great storytelling, it's sure to please. You won’t be able to put this down. Don't take my word for it... read these reviews for yourself.

Warning! These books are bad for you!

Banned Books 4Banned Books 4

Ever read a banned book? Check out the most challenged books of the 1990s. Are any of these titles favorites of yours?

As part of Banned Books Week September 23-30, the American Library Association would you to vote for your favorite banned book.

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (9/17/06)

Armed with good reviews, appearances on NPR and lots of publisher pr, Claire Messud enters the List for the first time with her own 9/11 novel. She joins three other veterans returning with their latest books.

At #1 is Rise and Shine by Anna Quindlen: "The lives of two sisters, one the host of a television show and the other a social worker."

At #5 is The Emperor's Children by Claire Messud: "A group of privileged 30-somethings try to make their way in literary New York just before 9/11."

At #6 is Armegeddon's Children by Terry Brooks: "In an urban, postapocalyptic United States, Knights of the Word battle the Void."

At #16 is Fool Me Once by Fern Michaels: "A young woman grapples with revelations about her mother's true identity and her past."

An Apple for Agatha

Now that the weather's cooler, cuddle up with your favorite Agatha Christie mystery in celebration of her birthday today, September 16. Christie, born in Devon, England in 1890, was most famous for her Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple novels. By the time of her death in 1976, she had written over 100 novels and was the best selling English novelist in history.

While reading, grab an apple in celebration of "International Eat An Apple Day." There are so many varieties of Johnny Appleseed's favorite fruit that even just in Michigan, there are many to choose from like the rare Arkansas Black apple that originated in Missouri.

The Library has many books on apples. Two new ones are Best Apples to Buy and Grow published by the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and the charming picture book by Swedish writer, Gorel Kristina Naslund, Our Apple Tree in which two elfin children descibe the life cycle of an apple tree.

Willie Nelson- what a voice

Willie what a voiceWillie what a voice

Willie Nelson's music was featured recently 9-4-06 on the NPR show FRESH AIR. You'll be glad to know that Country music singer and songwriter Willie Nelson's newest book is The Tao of Willie: A Guide to the Happiness in Your Heart. Nelson, performing 50 years plus, has recorded 250 albums and appeared in 25 films. Willie is a national treasure with a voice that really speaks to the listener. I just hope to someday see him (he's now 73) in a live concert.

Syndicate content