Fun Fantasy

Are you about 10 years old and like to read Fantasy? Guess what? I REALLY liked the following titles so I'm letting you know!!
Brainboy And The Deathmaster by Tor Seidler, follows Darryl, a twelve-year-old techno-genius, who finds himself the star of his very own life-threatening video game. YIKES!
The Skull Of Truth by Bruce Coville, follows Charlie, a sixth-grader with a compulsion to tell lies. Charlie acquires a mysterious skull that forces its owner to tell only the truth. Hoo BOY!
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Kid Bits - Home

Preschool Storytime Programs begin the week of September 11, and will run for 6 weeks in a row. This week at Malletts Creek and Pittsfield will be stories about "My Home". Here are a few titles to try ... We Were Tired of Living In a House by Leisel Skorpen, The Big Orange Splot by Daniel Pinkwater, From Here To There by Margery Cuyler, {b:b1033647| A House Is A House For Me] by Mary Ann Hoberman, and Lizard's Song by George Shannon.

2007 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads finalists

Three finalists for the 2007 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads have been chosen. Click on the link below for more information about each title.

The Partly Cloudy Patriot, by Sarah Vowell (2002)

Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, a Man who would Cure the World, by Tracy Kidder (2003)

Better Together: Restoring the American Community, by Robert Putnam (2003)

Let us know what you think!

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #33

Reyna Grande’s debut novel Across a Hundred Mountains is a stunning and poignant story of migration, loss and discovery.

Under desperate circumstances in a Tijuana jail, young Juana Garcia and teenage prostitute Adelina Vasquez met and their heartbreaking stories intertwined in the novel's alternating chapters, and re-crossed years later in the most unexpected ways. Starred review in Publishers Weekly.

A 2003 PEN Emerging Voices Fellow, Grande was born in Guerrero, Mexico. With an insider’s perspective, she puts a human face on one of the most controversial issues of our time – Mexican immigration to the United States. A writer to watch, she is currently at work on her second novel.

In Memoriam: September 11

On the fifth anniversary of this unprecedented event in American history, the Library remembers with the exhibit New York, September 11; a staged reading of the "The Guys" by the Purple Rose Theatre Company; a panel discussion for survivors and families; a community forum with a panel of experts from the UM Department of Psychiatry; plus dozens of books and videos.

college 101

If you're just starting college, thinking about it or looking back, you might find these novels about college life entertaining if not totally realistic.

In Making Stuff Up, by Bill James, passions and rivalries erupt in a creative writing class. The president of the college tries to smooth things over while struggling to keep the college afloat.

Blue Angel by Francine Prose is a hilarious and cynical portrayal of college life, especially writers and English departments. She satirizes the pervasive feminist interpretation of literature by the women's studies teachers and empathizes with the disillusioned creative writing instructors who are resigned to reading some awful student work.

Elinor Lipman has also presented a farcical account of college life in her newest novel, My Latest Grievance, the story of Frederica Hatch, the precocious daughter of two activist professors who are also dorm parents at a small New England women's college.`

Jamie Lee Curtis to Kids: Make Good Choices

Jamie Lee Curtis has a rhythmic new children's book out, Is There Really a Human Race?, with illustrations by Laura Cornell. The frenzied race metaphor plays out through this picture book, and at one point a boy tells us that if we don't help each other, we'll all crash. Curtis joins a chorus of other Baby Boomers in hoping that children will one day make our world a better place. Admirable, that hope.

Local author's book featured on PBS today

Local author Nancy Shaw's, Sheep on a Ship will be featured on Between the Lions today at 1:30 p.m. on the Detroit station, WTVS, with a repeat next Tuesday, September 12, at the same time. Click here to find out the PBS schedule for channels 23 and 28.

Presidential Summer Reading

Apparently The Stranger, by Albert Camus was not the only intellectually challenging book on President Bush's reading list this summer. Adam Gopnik, writing in the Aug. 28 New Yorker, names two others on what he describes as "An amazingly strenuous list, actually." The bonus books were American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer by Kai Bird and Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power, by Richard Carwardine. Whether Bush has actually read either of these books is unclear to me. But even if he has, that's only three for the summer - two short of the five books required to finish the AADL Summer Reading Game. Better luck next year, Mr. President.

Invasion of the mini-books!

Have you ever wondered what your favorite book would look like in miniature? Well, now's your chance! This Sunday, September 10th, marks the fourth annual Kerrytown BookFest and this year the special guest is the Miniature Book Society (MBS). The festival will be accompanied by lectures, demonstrations and plenty of exhibitors showing and selling books of all kinds. So come to the BookFest and pick up some new, potentially tiny, reading material!

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