New York Times Bestseller: Elizabeth Edwards

Coming in at #7 this week on the New York Times hardcover bestsellers list is Elizabeth Edwards' memoir, Saving Graces. Edwards, the wife of former vice presidential candidate John Edwards, has written a fascinating account of her life in law and politics, and an uplifting account of how she has survived both the tragic loss of her son Wade and her recent fight against breast cancer. You might also want to check out John Edwards' account of his legal career and family life in Four Trials, or take a look on-line at the Wade Edwards Foundation, which provides computer labs and other learning resources for schoolchildren.

2006 Quill Book Awards - Children's Categories

The second annual Quill Book Awards were announced on October 10 at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. The awards ceremony will be aired on NBC on October 28.
The winners in the three youth categories are all sequels.
In the category of Children's Illustrated Books the winner is Laura Numeroff's If You Give a Pig a Party. It is illustrated by Felicia Bond. It is the fifth in her series of circular cause-and-effect stories.
Lemony Snicket's The Penultimate Peril won The Quill in the category of Children's Chapter Books/Middle Grades. This is #12 in the author's Series of Unfortunate Events that just came to an end with the October 13th release of #13 The End.
The Young Adult/Teen award went to Christopher Paolini's The Eldest, the sequel to 2003's Eragon.

Fans of Mercury, mark your calendars!!!

Mercury TransitMercury Transit

On Wednesday, November 8, the planet Mercury will pass directly in front of the Sun. This event is known as the Transit of Mercury and occurs 13 to 14 times per century. Mercury will appear as a very tiny black dot as it makes its way across the Sun’s face. Since only a tiny spot will be covered, it is still dangerous to look directly at the Sun. Some ways to safely view solar events are through eclipse glasses or by means of a pinhole projector. The best way to see the movement of Mercury would be through a telescope equipped with a sun-safe H-alpha filter. If this isn’t possible, don’t fret. You can visit the SOHO website to watch it from the comfort of your nearest computer.

The University of Michigan Angell Hall Observatory, complete with a 0.4-m (16-inch) diameter reflecting telescope equipped with a CCD camera, will be hosting an open house for the event. Click here for information.

If you miss it this time you will have to wait 10 years for another opportunity. The next Transit of Mercury is expected to occur May 9, 2016.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #38

Edward Glyver - booklover, scholar, and murderer is the narrator in this exemplary blend of intrigue, history and romance, marking a standout literary debut with The Meaning of Night: A confession by Michael Cox. It took the author 30 years to complete, and snagged him the highest advance in publication history. Read more.

Glyver always believes he is destined for greatness, but standing between him and his rightful inheritance is his archnemesis, the poet-criminal Phoebus Rainsford Daunt. Resourceful Eddy will stop at nothing to claim what is his.

Fans of Wilkie Collins, Iain Pears, and David Liss would appreciate the expectedly wicked twists, and the well drawn cast of characters. Anyone interested in scrupulously researched background and details of everyday Victorian life, as in Michel Faber’s The Crimson Petal and the White and Sarah Waters’s Fingersmith would find an enthralling and suspenseful read here.

All-starred reviews from Booklist, Library Journal, and Publishers Weekly. Highly recommended.

Libros para celebrar el Dia de los Muertos

Dia de los Muertos (meaning "Day of the Dead") celebrations run from October 31 through November 2. Teach your child about this ancient Aztec holiday and celebrate the memory of your loved ones with these books from our youth collection:

Felipa and the Day of the Dead by Birte Müller
Beto and the Bone Dance by Gina Freschet
Clatter Bash!:a Day of the Dead Celebration by Richard Keep.
Calavera Abecedario : a Day of the Dead Alphabet Book by Jeanette Winter
Day of the Dead by Linda Lowery
The Skeleton at the Feast : the Day of the Dead in Mexico by Elizabeth Carmichael and Chloë Sayer.

World Series: Detroit vs. St. Louis: 1968 (Part Two)

McLainMcLain

Retrosheet has the box score and play-by-play for each game of the series

Some of the key players for the Tigers: Al Kaline (his only World Series appearance), Jim Northrup, Mickey Stanley, Dick McAuliffe, Norm Cash, Bill Freehan (coached the U-M baseball team from 1990-1995), Willie Horton, Don Wert, Mickey Lolich, Denny McLain, Pat Dobson, Earl Wilson, Joe Sparma.

Some of the key players for the Cardinals: Mike Shannon, Lou Brock, Curt Flood (the library has two recent books about his challenge of the reserve clause, leading to free agency), Orlando Cepeda, Julian Javier, Tim McCarver, Dal Maxvill, Roger Maris, Bob Gibson, Nellie Briles, Ray Washburn, Joe Hoerner, Ron Willis, Steve Carlton.

Managers: Mayo Smith (Tigers), Red Schoendienst (Cardinals).

John Fetzer was the Tigers owner.

The Tigers’ home games were played at the old Tigers Stadium:
A Place for Summer: a Narrative History of Tiger Stadium by Richard Bak
Home, Sweet Home: Memories of Tiger Stadium from the archives of the Detroit News
The Corner: a Century of Memories at Michigan and Trumbull by Richard Bak

Announcers: Ernie Harwell and Ray Lane were the radio announcers on WJR for the Tigers; George Kell and Larry Osterman covered the games on TV for WJBK; Harry Caray and Jack Buck announced for the Cardinals.

World Events in 1968: Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy assassinations; riots at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago; My Lai and the Tet offensive; Prague Spring; student protests in Berkeley, Ann Arbor, and the Sorbonne; Yippies; and Richard Nixon’s election as President.

Nineteen Sixty-Eight: a Personal Report by Hans Koning
1968: the Year That Rocked the World by Mark Kurlansky
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Anthony Shadid Visits AADL

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Anthony Shadid will visit the Downtown Library on Sunday, October 29 from 3:00 to 4:30 pm to discuss his book Night Draws Near: Iraq's People in the Shadow of America's War. The program will include a booksigning with ample opportunity for discussion.

Shadid has a remarkable body of work as a reporter from Iraq - and this should be an exceptional event.

World Series: Detroit vs. St. Louis: 1968 (Part One)

In 1968 it had been twenty-three years since the Tigers' last World Series appearance when they beat the Cubs in 1945 (this year the wait has only been twenty-two years).

1968 was the last year before the league championship series began. There was no designated hitter. The Tigers won the American League by 12 games with a 103-59 season. The Cardinals were the defending World Series champions and had won the National League by 10 games with a 97-65 season.

Game 1 (October 2) (St. Louis): St. Louis 4, Detroit 0
Game 2 (October 3) (St. Louis): Detroit 8, St. Louis 1
Game 3 (October 5) (Detroit): St. Louis 7, Detroit 3
Game 4 (October 6) (Detroit): St. Louis 10, Detroit 1
Game 5 (October 7) (Detroit): Detroit 5, St. Louis 3
Game 6 (October 9) (St. Louis): Detroit 13, St. Louis 1
Game 7 (October 10) (St. Louis): Detroit 4, St. Louis 1

Detroit’s Mickey Lolich (3-0) and St. Louis’ Bob Gibson (2-1) each pitched three complete games and each had an ERA of 1.67 for the World Series. Gibson’s World Series ERA was 0.55 runs higher than his baseball leading 1.12 regular season ERA. Gibson set the single game World Series record with 17 strikeouts in game one (at least one in each inning) and the series record with 35 strikeouts.

The library has two books about the 1968 Detroit Tigers:

The Tigers of ’68: Baseball’s Last Real Champions by George Cantor
Year of the Tiger: the Diary of Detroit’s World Champions by Jerry Green

We also have the Ann Arbor News on microfilm at the Downtown Library if you want to read the newspaper coverage of the series.
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Ever wonder what happened to your favorite fairy tale characters?

What if all of your favorite nursery rhyme, storybook and fable characters turned out to be real and were secretly living in present day New York? What happened to Snow White after she married Prince Charming? Did the Big Bad Wolf have any further pursuits after his run in with the Three Pigs? Bill Willingham answers these questions and more in his Eisner award winning comics series, Fables.

Writer Bill Willingham goes back to the original dark and sinister versions of the fairy tales, before they were ‘Disneyfied’. He has also added modern sensibilities to the stories, giving them a soap opera feel. This series is definitely not for children!

Look for other influences throughout the story-line, including Animal Farm, Lord of the Flies and Seven Days in May. Also, be sure to check out the latest in this series, 1001 Nights of Snowfall, (released this week) to explore character backstories as told by Snow White.

Massive police hunt in England! Two children vanish!

An encounter with an anti-gravity machine catapults Peter and Kate back to the 18th century and sets in motion a calamitous chain of events. While a massive police hunt gets underway to find the missing children in the 21st century – in 1763 a hardened criminal, the Tar Man, steals the anti-gravity machine and disappears into the London underworld.

Stranded in another time and forced to chase the Tar Man to his lair, Peter and Kate find a friend and guide in reformed cutpurse, Gideon Seymour. Gideon does every thing he can to help them, but will his dark past catch up with him before the machine is recovered?

Read Gideon the Cutpurse or listen to it on CD. Above description taken from the book's web site.

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