Andrew Bird

Andrew Bird once played the violin for swing-revival band Squirrel Nut Zippers, but his newest solo album, Andrew Bird and the Mysterious Production of Eggs, has an eclectic sound that leans more toward folk/rock than toward jazz. Bird puts on a great live show, so be sure to catch him when he performs at the Ark on November 9.

Anarchy!

You've seen the capital A inscribed in a circle, but what does anarchism really stand for? Check out some of these books and CDs in the library's collection to learn more about anarchism. For a historical perspective, try something about Emma Goldman or Peter Kropotkin, or most anything written by historian Paul Avrich. If you're interested in more contemporary anarchist thought and activism, try Abbie Hoffman's Steal This Book or Corrinne Jacker's The Black Flag of Anarchy: Antistatism in the U.S. And if you'd like to listen to anarchist or other left-wing music, check out the following:

Saddle Up, Cowboy

And listen to some dang good westerns from William Johnstone. In Trek of the Mountain Man Smoke Jensen heads to his ranch – and so do a cutthroat bunch of bounty hunters determined to catch the legendary mountain man. When that ride’s over partner, give a listen to Vengeance of the Mountain Man and Warpath of the Mountain Man.

Like your westerns more modern? Then mosey on over to National Book Award winner Cormac McCarthy’s Border Trilogy. All the Pretty Horses, The Crossing, and Cities of the Plain tell the story of young man’s magical and troubling journey to Mexico. McCarthy’s prose will stop your heart.

New and Upcoming CD Releases

Stevie WonderA Time to Love: He’s back after 10 years away, and his music is still soulful and enjoyable.

Ricky MartinLife: Shake Your Bon Bon again with the star who brought the Latin-pop movement to the U.S.

Liz PhairSomebody’s Miracle: She has continued her new pop phase (which began in 2003 with her self-titled album Liz Phair) still steering clear of her 90’s cynicism.

The Play Ground

band 6

BAND-O-RAMA! How can I write this as loud as The Play Ground would like to shout it? Having attended this Michigan Tradition many times, I can enthusiastically recommend it. Band-o-rama features the Symphony Band, Concert Band and the Michigan Marching Band-and it is amazing and thrilling to see the entire band marching in time on the stage of Hill Auditorium.

Kids Bits - Add Salsa

Manana Iguana is a Latin birthday nod to the Little Red Hen story "Who will help Me?" Soy Una Pizza provides plenty of songs to party in Spanish. Putumayo's Latin Playground will put mood into the next reading of the book before the return to the Library.

Baby Bits - Shoes

"There once was a baby who hid in a shoe, and had learned how to say, 'How do you do?'" Shoe Baby builds with rhyme and fantasy. Follow your Read-Aloud with flavorful music and dance with your "Shoe Baby". There's Elvis Rock-n-roll in Blue Suede Shoes Elvis Songs for Kids, Children's Songs in Happy Feet, or Jazz era Swing with Fidgety Feet.

A Girl Called Eddy

A Girl Called Eddy is actually a girl called Erin Moran who wears her pop influences on her sleeve. Echoes of Karen Carpenter, Carole King and Dusty Springfield run through her debut album, but Moran's heartfelt lyrics and slightly jazzy vocals make this a great album in its own right, and not merely a pale imitation of the classics.

Sophomore Release from Franz Ferdinand

Franz Ferdinand just recently released their second album titled You Could Have It So Much Better. New bands oftentimes have some difficulty with their sophomore effort, but “it's a stunning, confident piece of work that suggests the band is merely getting started.” (Amazon.com) Their first single off the album is a catchy punk-pop song called “Do You Want To.” The AADL has several copies on order, so get yourself on the hold list! If you haven’t checked out this group yet, we also own their first album, which is self-titled.

The Play Ground

Busy, busy, busy. One old, one new. The Boys From Syracuse, a physical comedy full of farcical mischief will be at the Mendelssohn Theatre at the Michigan League on October 13-16. This was the first musical to be adapted from the works of Shakspeare when it opened in 1938. If you love Shakespeare, Richard Rogers, Lorenz Hart or George Abbott this is the play to see.
The Performance Network is co-premiering Joan Ackerman's play about a poetess who lives in happy obscurity until her neighbor, Edith Wharton, passes her work along to an editor who wants to publish it. Through October 30th.

Syndicate content