Constructive Construction Commutes

construction

It's orange cone season again in Michigan and time to take along a few books on cd to ease the wait. You can’t beat Martha Grimes to keep your mind on the mystery and off the traffic backups. Her newest title, The Old Wine Shades takes Richard Jury on a hunt for a vanished woman and her dog. Science Fiction fans will applaud the audio release of Robert Heinlein’s The Door Into Summer, a time traveler classic. When the ride gets really bumpy, pop in some humor and laugh the rest of the way to work. Try Dave Barry’s Money Secrets Like, Why is There a Giant Eyeball on the Dollar?

Anniversary of a mutiny

mutiny

On April 28, 1789, Fletcher Christian led a mutiny of the ship HMS Bounty, which was loaded with breadfruit tree plants from Tahiti and bound for Jamaica. Rebelling against their cruel captain, Lieutenant William Bligh, Christian took some of his crew and some Tahitians to Pitcairn Island where they burned the Bounty and remained undiscovered for eighteen years. Bligh and some of his followers miraculously survived a forty-seven day journey in an open boat and landed on the island of Timor.

To get the full details, read Mutiny on the Bounty by Charles Nordhoff or see either of two films, one made in 1935 with Charles Laughton and Clark Gable, the other in 1962 with Marlon Brando.

Literary Mysteries by Boris Akunin

The Diane Rehm Show on Tuesday, April 25th featured an interview with Russian author Boris Akunin, the pen name of Grigory Chkhartishvili. His literary detective novels became bestsellers in Russia and soon spread to the English-speaking world. The AADL owns several of his books in both English and Russian, as well as The Winter Queen and Murder on the Leviathan as books-on-CD. Can anyone spot the sly allusion to a certain Russian thinker hidden in Chkhartishvili's pen name?

Ma Rainey turns 120

April 26 marks the 120th birthday of Gertrude Pridgett, otherwise known as Ma Rainey, legendary "Mother of the Blues." Rainey was the first great professional blues recording artist and, by all accounts, the first woman to incorporate blues into vaudeville and minstrel shows. AADL owns a variety of books and CDs on the life and work of the blues pioneer, including, "Ma Rainey" and Blues Legacies and Black Feminism. She's also featured in Ma Rainey's Black Bottom, August Wilson's 1982 play about racism and black rage set during a fictional recording session in a run-down Chicago recording studio in 1927.

Bestsellers on Audio

The usual suspects top the New York Times bestseller list this month: Jonathan Kellerman’s Gone, James Patterson’s 5th Horseman, Steve Berry’s Templar Legacy, Jodi Picoult’s Tenth Circle, Tami Hoag’s Prior Bad Acts and Danielle Steel’s The House. Following up on the popularity of the Da Vinci Code, Javier Sierra joins the list with The Secret Supper, about a papal inquisitor's investigation of the secret hidden in da Vinci's The Last Supper .

So That’s How They Do It

It’s not until you’re halfway through that seemingly simple task that you realize you really don’t know what you’re doing. How do you tie a bow tie? What does sort the laundry mean exactly? When will the paint dry? Listen to The Experts' Guide to 100 Things Everyone Should Know How to Do and hear Larry King, Letitia Baldrige, Bob Vila and 97 others explain the intricacies of your to-do list.

Hear This Book!

If you missed it when it first came out, you must hear the Pulitzer-prize winning novel, The Known World by Edward P. Jones. Every accolade and prize is deserved for this exquisitely written story of a black slave-owner in the antebellum South. Time called it "a masterpiece that deserves a place in the American literary canon." Equal praise is in order for his short story collection, Lost in the City. The stories rank with the best of O’Hara, Salinger and Fitzgerald.

Young Parrotheads' fancies turn to . . . country music?

With the upcoming film release of Carl Hiaasen's Newbery honor book Hoot, there's potential to create a whole new generation of Parrotheads. Everyone's favorite resident of Margaritaville, Jimmy Buffett, not only produced and stars in the film, but he also penned much of its original soundtrack.

Of course, Mr. Buffett isn't the only artist who stands to benefit from an influx of new fans. Many country musicians carry on this tradition of carefree beach relaxation, not the least of whom is one of Buffett's most prominent successors: Kenny Chesney. Despite having such distinctly un-parrotlike hits as "She Thinks My Tractor's Sexy," Chesney has staked his claim in the Parrothead pantheon with such songs as "When the Sun Goes Down" and "No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problem." Indeed, his 2004 album Be As You Are is a veritable smorgasbord of tropical freewheeling goodness.

Young and old Parrotheads alike may also enjoy the works of some other country greats such as Alan Jackson, Toby Keith, or the legendary Willie Nelson.

Music to your ears... Food for your soul...

Join the University Musical Society in welcoming Sweet Honey In The Rock at Hill Auditorium on Saturday, April 22 at 8pm.

For over 30 years, this Grammy-award winning a cappella ensemble of six African American women have combined spirituals, hymns, gospel - as well as jazz and blues to raise awareness about the social injustices in the U.S. and around the world. The words are also beautifully interpreted in American Sign Language.

Can't make it to the concert? Or you've heard them and want more? Check out AADL's selection of their music.

The Play Ground

The Play Ground

The Play Ground welcomes Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg back to the UMS after a 15 year absence. Salerno-Sonnenberg burst onto the scene in 1981 as a young violinist star and is known as original and fearless. She is accompanied by Anne-Marie McDermott who is described as a "luminous, boldly emotive pianist who conveys great sensitivity" in her playing. Sounds like a concert that is not to be missed. Friday, April 21, 8pm at Hill Auditorium.

Syndicate content