The Safety Dance, Time After Time, Etc.

Have you read Ready Player One yet? If you haven’t yet, you should! For everyone finished with the book, did you catch yourself humming those 80’s hits or wanting to rewatch any sweet 80’s flicks? Immerse yourself in the OASIS easter egg hunt with the help of your trusty library!

Here are lists of the Movies, Music, Anime, TV Shows, and Books referenced by Parzival and his friends.

Amazon Bestseller: Reason to Breathe

Currently #7 on the Amazon Best Sellers in Teen Books is Reason to Breathe (The Breathing Series #1), by Rebecca Donovan The Amazon description calls the novel "an electrifying page turner from start to finish, a unique tale of life-changing love, unspeakable cruelty, and one girl’s fragile grasp of hope." The novel incorporates a number of musical references. "I inserted descriptions of music throughout the entire book," the author writes on her webpage. "At times, it was a specific band and/or song, other times it was just a genre." Donovan's "unofficial soundtrack" for Reason to Breathe includes the song Only by the musical group Nine Inch Nails.

Bob Babbitt, Funk Brothers bassist, has died

Bob Babbitt rockin' bass player for the Funk Brothers, THE studio band for Motown's heaviest hitters, died Monday In Nashville, TN.

Babbitt moved to Detroit in the 1950s while still in his teens. Then from 1959 until Motown relocated to Los Angeles in 1972, the Funk Brothers backed up every megawatt performer from Stevie Wonder to the Temptations to Marvin Gaye to Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, to name just a few.

A 2002 documentary, Standing in the Shadows of Motown brought the Funk Brothers out of obscurity, especially after the group received a Lifetime Achievement award at the 2004 Grammys.

In 2008, the Funk Brothers packed the house at a concert which was part of the Ann Arbor Summer Festival.

Mr. Babbitt, who was 74, died of an inoperable brain tumor.

Kitty Wells, country music's first woman superstar, has died

Kitty Wells, country music's acknowledged first female superstar, died yesterday at her Tennessee home.

Her leap to stardom with the much-loved standard, It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels, almost didn't happen. She had been singing and perform since 1936, a year before she married her husband of more than 70 years, Johnnie Wright. In 1952, she was on the verge of retiring to become a fulltime wife and mother. But she agreed to record Honky Tonk Angels to collect the union-scale fee.

Angels became an instant hit, despite being initially banned by NBC radio and the Grand Ole Opry (too racy). Not only did the recording top the country charts for six weeks, it also made it onto the pop Top 40, forcing Nashville to rethink its belief that women country singers would not be money makers.

Ms. Wells was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1976. Fifteen years later, she became the third country western performer (after Hank Williams and Roy Acuff) to receive a lifetime achievement award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.

Ms. Wells, who was 92, died of complications from a stroke. Her survivors include two children, eight grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, and five great-great-grandchildren.

LISTEN!! Digital Music News: Who is Yona?, Hurdy-Gurdy!, Burning Down the World, Celtic Folklore, Cameroon Tunes


YOU can access almost 1,000 digital music albums directly through our AADL.org catalog. Stream or download as much as you like, DRM free, on any device you choose. No waiting for a copy. No due dates. Hooray!

POP / ROCK
Chiwawa: He Who Sings Thinks No Evil
Chiwawa's debut album, "The Sick World Of Yona", was released in 1998. It was produced by Steve Whitfield (The Cure, The Mission among others). The record quickly became a hit with the critics, securing the band a strong and loyal to this day fan base. The first single "Below Zero" still resonates on the airwaves, after 13 years. "The Sick World of Yona" consists of 13 tracks which shift in mood, tempo, atmosphere and flavour.

CLASSICAL / WORLD
Viva La Pepa: Spanish, Sephardic and French Traditions Served On A Bed Of Drones
¡Viva la Pepa! draws on musical traditions from Spain, France, and the Sephardic diaspora, covering a musical timeline from the Middle Ages to the present. The group's signature sound from reflective to rousing can be attributed to the haunting and unique combination of the vocals and the hurdy-gurdy. The multi-instrumentalists delight and entertain with a musical sleight of hand that includes guitar, accordion, hurdy-gurdy, Spanish lute, bagpipes, psaltery, tromba marina, recorders, cajon, darabuka, davul and more.

METAL / PUNK / ROCK
Jackalopes: High Energy Horror-Punk Rock and Roll
The Jackalopes are a Hi-Energy, Horror, Occult and B-Movie inspired, Punk Rock and Roll band from Dayton, Ohio. With influences ranging from 50's Rock and Roll, 60's Garage and Psychedelia, 70's Country, Southern Stoner, Acid Rock and Punk to 80's Deathrock, Goth, Industrial, Metal and New Wave to the 90's Noise and Alternative bands, and of course the Cult movies from all of the above eras, The Jackalopes blend it all into an invigorating stew of something old, something new.

ALT ROCK / FOLK
Jasmine Brunch: A Secret Garden of Lucid Musical Dreams
Here you will find mountain dulcimers, ukuleles, guitars, accordions, mandolins, pianos and others doing some of the things they do best. The Mews album is a modern tribute to the space between Celtic folklore and Bluegrass music. The music pays tribute to the traditional sounds of Jigs and Reels, as well as fusing different styles and taking the musical ingredients of Celtic-American folklore one step (sometimes two steps) further.

WORLD
Kaissa: Modern African Music With Elements of R&B, Pop, and Jazz
"Looking There" showcases various rhythms from Cameroonian Makossa to reggae, Afro-beat and R&B. Kaïssa has drawn from Cameroon's cultural vibrancy and her family's musical tradition. The themes are love, loss, sociopolitical issues, women's rights, hope, optimism, poverty, war, unrest, honoring ancestors and immigration. Holding it all together is the focus on her hauntingly beautiful voice, powerful yet silky.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #340 - Accidental Sleuths

Tessa Harris' The Anatomist's Apprentice (in audio) opens in 1780 London with the death of 19 year-old Sir Edward Crick, a dissolute young man mourned only by his sister Lady Lydia Farrell. Dr. Thomas Silkstone, a young anatomist from Philadelphia, known for his forensic skills and unconventional methods, is asked to investigate when Lydia's husband Capt. Michael Farrell comes under suspicion.

(Debut novelist) "Harris has more than a few tricks up her sleeve, and even veteran armchair puzzle solvers are likely to be surprised".

In the aftermath of the Great War and a devastating family tragedy, Laurence Bartram lives a solitary life in a London attic, devoting all his time and effort to the writing of an architectural history of English churches. When Mary Emmett writes to ask him to look into the suspicious death of his friend John while in the care of a remote veterans' hospital, his investigation forces him to face his own demons, and draws him back into the world of the living.

"At once a compelling mystery and an elegant literary debut, British historian Elizabeth Speller blends the psychological depth of Pat Barker's Regeneration trilogy with lively storytelling from the golden age of British crime fiction", in the first of a projected series with The Return of Captain John Emmett (2011). Just released is the follow-up, entitled The Strange Fate of Kitty Easton in which Bartram arrives in the village of Easton Deadall and is embroiled in a dangerous case involving a murdered woman who may be linked to the disappearance of a child years earlier.

Both of these debut mysteries/series will appeal to fans of the Inspector Ian Rutledge series (in audio) by Charles Todd (Charles Todd is the joint pseudonym for the mother-and-son writing team of Charles Todd and Caroline Todd, pseudonyms of David Todd Watjen and Caroline L.T. Watjen); the John Madden series by Rennie Airth; the Nell Bray Series by Gillian Linscott; and the Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear.

Story Collider @ LIVE this Thursday

Science and great storytelling come together again this Thursday when Story Collider comes back to Ann Arbor. This time we've taken the show out of the library to Live! located at 102 S. First Street (on the corner of First and Huron), but regulars can expect the same kinds of stories about science in people's lives. Storytellers sharing stories about Breakthroughs include:
-Ryan Burns, electronics engineer, founder and host of Ignite Ann Arbor, and president of the board of A2Geeks
-Jonathan Cohen, computer scientist and filmmaker
-Madeline Huberth, musician and acoustics student
-Christopher Roussi, senior research scientist at Michigan Tech University
-Aaron Santos, physicist and author
-Danielle Schultz, organic chemist

If you want to learn more about Story Collider and how it came about, check out our podcast interview with co-host and co-creator Brian Wecht. And if you missed previous installments, you can watch Story Collider Ann Arbor events from January, July, and last March from AADL in our Video on Demand collection.

Story Collider: Breakthroughs | Thursday, June 21 | 7pm | LIVE

Rick Riordan's Heroes of Olympus

Rick Riordan, who has been called "the god of mythology-minded tween literature," is hard at work finishing the third installment in his five-book Heroes of Olympus series. It will be called The Mark of Athena, and is due out on October 2. You can read the book’s first chapter at the Heroes of Olympus website.

This week, Disney-Hyperion will launch a new Web site, Greeks vs Romans, with the tagline: “Whose camp are you in?” As of Monday morning, the site has an image of a T-shirt, half purple and half orange, with the message "Camp Visits Starting Soon," so check back often, to see what will be revealed.

In the meantime, if you haven't already read or listened to the first 2 books in the series, here's your chance.

Book One: The Lost Hero. We have the book and the BOCD

Book Two: The Son of Neptune. Here's the book, and the BOCD

And if you want to read more about what Rick Riordan is doing these days, click here.

Doc Watson, the heart and soul of bluegrass guitar music, has died

Doc Watson, whose lightning-speed flatpicking style of guitar playing befuddled those who have tried to emulate it and who brought new life to folk music, died yesterday In Winston-Salem, NC, following complications from colon surgery.

Blinded when he was one, Doc Watson's first instrument was the harmonica. A few years later, at age 10, his father gave him a banjo and a neighbor gave him guitar lessons.

He eventually graduated to the electric guitar, playing with a rockabilly bind with an unreliable fiddle player. To fill the fiddle gap, Doc Watson figured out how to translate that sound to his guitar.

In the 1960s, Ralph Rinzler, a prominent folkie, encouraged Watson to go back to the acoustic guitar. Watson immediately became a hot commodity on the folk music circuit.

Toward the end of the 60s, Merle Watson, Doc's teenage son, joined his dad for a wonderfully successful run, fueled by their performance on Will the Circle Be Unbroken?, the million-plus album by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

Doc Watson's career was nearly derailed by his grief over the death of Merle in 1985, the result of a tractor accident.

Watson, who earned eight Emmys despite his deeply ingrained modesty, was 89 years old. His was the second death to rock the North Carolina and the national music world. Beloved Earl Scruggs died in March.

Robin Gibb, one of the Bee Gees brothers, has died

Robin Gibb, one of the Bee Gees who skyrocketed to fame with the soundtrack for Saturday Night Fever, THE hot disco movie of 1977, lost his long battle with liver and colon cancer on Sunday, May 20.

The Bee Gees -- Robin's twin, Maurice, died in 2003, and Barry, who survives at 65 -- were born in England and moved to Australia for several years before returning to England in the 1960s. Known for their high-pitched infectious harmonies, they had written several hits (including the #1 tune in the U.S. in 1971,"How Can You Mend a Broken Heart?"before skittering toward a financial precipice in the mid 70s. Just in time, they which caught the attention of filmmakers looking for music for Saturday Night Fever.

Robin said one of the key secrets to their success was to have "the tape running all the time" to catch moments of brilliance. This method seems to have worked in their favor as they had a one-week deadline for Saturday Night Fever to write the soundtrack, including How Deep Is Your Love, Night Fever, and Stayin' Alive.

Gibb, who was 62, died in London.

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