AXIS: Info for Teens 12-18.

New and Award-Winning Historical Fiction for Teens

Reading historical fiction can be a great way to learn more about past eras while still enjoying the fictional embellishments and projections of an author. This can be especially true for teens, as historical fiction presents a unique way to relate to coming-of-age individuals from the past and learn facts about bygone events and characters that can turn out to be helpful in school.

On our new teen shelf currently is The Red Umbrella, added to our collection in October 2013, which details the repercussions of the communist revolution on a teenage girl and her family living in Cuba in 1961. The author, Christina Diaz Gonzalez, makes the character of Lucia relatable and the events that Gonzalez describes are exciting and historically relevant.

Also new on our list of teen historical fiction is My Beautiful Hippie, by Janet Nichols Lynch. The story paints a vivid portrait of the cultural revolution in San Francisco in the late 1960s, and details the struggles of a teenage girl to fulfill the expectations of her traditional middle class family despite being drawn intensely to the alternative culture sweeping through the city.

Ann Rinaldi, who has been writing teen historical fiction for nearly 3 decades, is known for her carefully researched and extremely absorbing portraits of United States history. One of her most famous novels, The Fifth of March, tells the story of the Boston Massacre from the perspective of a servant in the house of John Adams. Rinaldi skillfully details the events of the Salem witch trials in her 1992 book A Break With Charity and describes the horrors of the Battle of Gettysburg in her most recent book, The Last Full Measure. Many of her over thirty historical novels for teens have won awards, including a New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age for The Fifth of March and ABA’s Pick of the Lists for her book The Coffin Quilt.

For more historical fiction recommendations for teens, check out the Historical Fiction-Librarians’ Choice for High School list on the public lists section of our website!

Film & Discussion: We Can't Eat Gold

Thursday November 14, 2013: 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

This event is intended for adults and teens (grade 9 and up).

“How does it feel when your ancestors have been surviving off the same land for thousands of years and then that land is threatened?” Residing about 250 miles southwest of Anchorage the people of Dillingham, Alaska have lived off of caribou and the world’s largest, most spectacular sockeye salmon fishery located in Bristol Bay. But now the proposed Pebble Mine that seeks to extract valuable deposits of gold, copper, and molybdenum threatens that way of life.

The documentary We Can’t Eat Gold, casts light on the sustainable living the people have made off the land and sea. It also gives voice to the concern of the Alaska Native elders and youths not only about the future but also the impacts the exploration of Pebble Mine has already had on the Bristol Bay region’s King Salmon and Caribou populations. With government approval pending will the people’s voice be heard?

Film director Joshua Tucker and producer Giovanna Marcantonio will be on hand to lead the discussion following the viewing of the film.

This event is cosponsored by the University of Michigan Community Scholars' Program.

Using Yoga to Fall Asleep

Monday November 18, 2013: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for adults and teens (grade 6 and up).

Difficulty in falling asleep is an issue for millions of Americans. Sleep loss increases stress hormone levels and blood pressure, glucose intolerance, and variations in heart rate.

Kundalini Yoga instructor Victoria Duranona will guide you through moves designed to help you relax. In addition she will offer Yogic tips for good sleep, suggestions on falling asleep, and nap advice as well as a few herbs that can help with sleep issues.

Dress comfortably and bring some kind of padding (e.g. towel, yoga mat) as you will be seated on the hard floor.

Test Taking 101 with Kaplan Experts

Wednesday, November 13 | 7:00-8:30 PM | Pittsfield Branch | Grades 9-12

Approach the ACT or SAT test day with confidence! A top Kaplan instructor will present strategies for preparing for the tests and guide you through some questions, demonstrating how to arrive at the correct answer.

Chesstastic on Sunday, November 10 at Traverwood

Sunday, November 10 | 1-4 PM | Traverwood Branch | Gr. K-Adult

Come and play one of the world's most popular games with players of all ages! Chess sets (and snacks) are provided.

Coming up in the “world” of chess is the 2013 SportsAccord World Mind Games held December 12-18 in Beijing. Chess along with other mind games. Check the list of players who will compete.

Book Sculptures

Wednesday, November 6 | 7-8:30pm | Pittsfield Branch | Grades 6th through adult

Are you ready to learn a new and slightly addictive craft?! Join us the evening of November 6th for some upcycling. At this craft event we will be turning unwanted paperback books into a variety of book sculptures, such as trees and hanging sculptures, using various folding techniques. All materials will be provided.

Hands-On Lab: Finding Funding for A College Education - November 6 & 7

Wed. & Thurs. November 6-7, 2013 |7:00 pm to 8:30 pm | Pittsfield Branch: Training Center

This event is intended for teens (grade 9 and up) and adults

UM Foundations and Grants Librarian Dr. Karen Downing and French Studies Librarian, Jennifer Bonnet present a workshop for high schoolers, their parents, and anyone seeking funding for college.

Learn about a variety of specialized Web resources, how to articulate a plan of study, identify potential funders, and apply for relevant educational grants.

We will also compare free Web resources and subscription-based services (U-M pays the subscription and provides free access). Participants will have time to search for scholarships during the session.

2013 Teens Top Ten announced

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA) has announced the official 2013 Teens’ Top Ten titles. A total of 32,000 teens cast their vote mid-August through mid-October for their favorite among 28 nominee titles. Check here for a video announcement featuring this year’s titles.

The official 2013 Teens’ Top Ten titles are as follows:
1. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
2. The False Prince by Jennifer A. Nielsen
3. Insurgent by Veronica Roth
4. Pushing the Limits by Katie McGarry
5. Poison Princess by Kresley Cole
6. The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
7. Crewel by Gennifer Albin
8. Every Day by David Levithan
9. Kill Me Softly by Sarah Cross
10. Butter by Erin Jade Lange

Controlled Burns In Ann Arbor's Natural Areas

Tuesday February 25, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Traverwood Branch: Program Room

This event is intended for adults and teens (grade 6 and up).

Natural Area Preservation (City of Ann Arbor) staff will explain what controlled burns are and why they are used in natural areas. This event is for anyone interested in helping with burns or those who are interested in learning more about them.

Prescribed or controlled burning is sometimes used in forest management, farming, or prairie restoration. Controlled burning stimulates the germination of some desirable forest trees, thus renewing the forest.

Comic Artists Forum with Cartoonist Jesse Hughes

Sunday November 3, 2013: 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

This event is intended for adults and teens (grade 6 and up).

CosmiCat creator Jesse Hughes will talk about developing expressive facial expressions and body language.

Join the Forum to get fresh ideas for your next comics or graphic novel creation. Drawing supplies are provided, so drop in to draw, learn, and network with other cartoonists.

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